Icom Uk British Council Travel Grant Scheme Is Open For Applications

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ICOM UK – British Council Travel Grant Scheme is open for applications

Applications are now open for the 2019-20 ICOM UK – British Council Travel Grant Scheme.

ICOM UK, with support from the British Council, is pleased to offer travel grants to support UK organisations seeking to build reciprocally beneficial international projects and partnerships.

The 2019-20 ICOM UK – British Council Travel Grant Scheme will enable recipients to undertake an international visit to meet with colleagues and share skills, expertise and experience.  The Travel Grant Scheme supports museums who are starting to develop mutually beneficial international projects and partnerships.

Applications will be considered for grants up to £1,500 per organisation or consortium for visits beyond greater Europe and up to £700 for visits within greater Europe.  The total amount of funding available for 2019-20 is £28,500.

The grant will cover the cost of travel, including international and local transport, visas, accommodation and subsistence.

Case Studies from previous grant recipients can be read on the ICOM UK website http://uk.icom.museum/resources/case-studies/

 

2019 DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS

Deadline for applications: 09:00 Monday 14 October 2019

Successful applicants notified: w/c 28 October 2019

Travel must be completed by: 30 June 2020

 

The eligibility criteria, guidelines and application form are available on the ICOM UK website at http://uk.icom.museum/about-us/bursaries/

Are you attending Kyoto 2019? Join the ICOM UK WhatsApp gourp

The Tonya Nelson (Chair), Catherine McDermott (Secretary), Arran Rees (Student & Emerging Professional Committee Member) and Dana Andrew (part-time Executive Director) will attend ICOM Kyoto 2019 this September as representatives of ICOM UK.

In addition to attending the National Committee and General Meetings, we hope to help members navigate the conference (it can be somewhat overwhelming attending an ICOM Triennial for the first time!), arrange an informal meetup in Kyoto, and help all UK delegates stay connected during the conference.

We have created a WhatsApp group for members attending Kyoto 2019.  Don’t worry, this won’t be filled with spam and cat memes (well, unless any members want to share their pictures of visiting cat cafes in Japan).  We hope it will be a useful tool for keeping in touch during the conference and meeting up during the large social events and excursions.

If you are attending Kyoto 2019 and would like to be added to the WhatsApp group, please send your mobile number to uk.icom.museum@gmail.com  Please be assured that your number will not be passed on to anyone else and that the WhatsApp group will be deleted after the conference.

We are also considering setting up an informal buddy system for first-time Triennial attendees.  If you would be interested in being a buddy to help out someone else or feel that having a buddy would be useful, again you can write to us at uk.icom.museum@gmail.com  When you contact us, please let us know which International Committee (IC) you are part of or which IC meetings you will attend.  We will try and pair people up with members of the same IC where possible.

If you have any ideas for the informal meet up in Kyoto, or any other ways ICOM UK might be able to support members with before and during Kyoto 2019, please let us know.

We look forward to seeing you in Japan!

Interview with Oyku Ozsoy, Istanbul Modern, Turkey

ICOM UK member Luigi Galimberti interviews Öykü Özsoy about the Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, Turkey.

Öykü Özsoy, Curator, Istanbul Modern

Öykü Özsoy, Curator, Istanbul Modern

Öykü Özsoy worked as an assistant curator at the Platform Garanti Contemporary Art Center (now SALT), where she was the co-director of the first international artists residency program in Turkey, from 2002 until 2010. With the support of the German Federal Cultural Foundation (Kulturstiftung des Bundes), Özsoy was a Fellow at the Wilhelm-Hack-Museum between 2013 and 2015, where she worked as a curator for two international exhibition projects. She co-curated two exhibitions at the Heidelberger Kunstverein in 2015 and 2016, and since 2017 she has been a curator at Istanbul Modern.  Öykü is a 2019 Tate Intensive Fellow.

 

 

Luigi Galimberti is a Board Member of Res Artis, the world’s largest membership-based network of artist residencies. He was previously Collection Care Research Manager at Tate, London.

 

Luigi: What is the history of Istanbul Modern and how has the institution changed since its foundation?

Öykü: Istanbul Modern was founded in 2004 as Turkey’s first museum of modern and contemporary art. Committed to sharing Turkey’s artistic creativity and cultural identity with the local and international art worlds, the museum hosts a broad array of interdisciplinary activities.

Learning activities at Istanbul Modern

Learning activities at Istanbul Modern

Istanbul Modern embraces a global vision to collect, preserve, document and exhibit works of modern and contemporary art and make them accessible to the public at large. The museum offers a variety of cultural activities in its permanent and temporary exhibition halls, photography gallery, spaces for educational and social programs, library, cinema, café, and store.

Through its collections, exhibitions, and educational programs, the museum aims to instil a love of the arts in visitors from all walks of life and encourage their active participation in the arts. Established in a building occupying an 8,000 square meter site in Karaköy on the shores of the Bosphorus, where it hosted exhibitions and events for 14 years, Istanbul Modern has moved to a temporary space in Beyoğlu, where it welcomes visitors from May 2018 onward for three years while the new building is being constructed.

 

Luigi: Whose story are you preserving and whom are you telling them to?

From the collection exhibition In Pursuit of the Present, Istanbul Modern, 2019

From the collection exhibition In Pursuit of the Present, Istanbul Modern, 2019

Öykü: At Istanbul Modern, we present exhibitions that offer visitors the opportunity to view painting, sculpture, installation, video, new media and photographic works created in Turkey since the beginning of the twentieth century, while also learning about the fundamentals and following the transformation of modern and contemporary art in Turkey. We organize temporary exhibitions with themes that allow us to bring together works by important artists from around the world with works by artists from Turkey. Each artwork mirrors the social, cultural, historical, economic and political dynamics of the period in which it was produced.

The educational programs that we offer in conjunction with our exhibitions enable viewers of all ages to better understand and experience these exhibitions. Since the opening, Istanbul Modern’s most significant contribution to society has been to create a museum experience that is welcoming and easy to understand, while providing alternative educational approaches. Istanbul Modern is a living, breathing and continuously transforming space that brings new stories related to humankind, and where visitors can come together with artworks and artists.

 

Luigi: What would you like your audience to take home after visiting the museum?

Ara Güler, Eminönü, 1954. From the exhibition Two Archives, One Selection: Tracing Ara Güler’s Footsteps in Istanbul, Istanbul Modern, 2019

Ara Güler, Eminönü, 1954. From the exhibition Two Archives, One Selection: Tracing Ara Güler’s Footsteps in Istanbul, Istanbul Modern, 2019

Öykü: Museums, with the approaches they develop, have the potential to create democratic spaces where communities of people from different walks of life come together and interact, in addition to their function to protect, examine, exhibit and carry works of art into the future. Programs that liberate audiences from their passive positions as mere viewers and to transform them into active participants, is something that Istanbul Modern is vigorously working on. With the exhibitions and educational programs that we realise at Istanbul Modern, we hope that our visitors will use their aesthetic and sensory experience to make sense of the world around them and develop new interpretations of it. Furthermore, it brings us great joy when visitors are curious to learn more about a subject, artist or artwork that they have not encountered before or are not familiar with.

 

Luigi: How has the museum been reacting to Turkey’s changing society?

Öykü: As a museum, we believe in sustainability and the importance of being able to offer interdisciplinary content in various areas of artistic practice to a wide range of people who are interested in art. In this regard, we act according to our founding vision to simultaneously host our country’s multicultural richness and universal values and to continuously present the transformations taking place in the world of contemporary art to our visitors.

 

Luigi: Can you tell us of a recent show, activity or commission that you have curated?

From the exhibition The Event of a Thread, Istanbul Modern, 2019

From the exhibition The Event of a Thread, Istanbul Modern, 2019

Öykü: The most recent exhibition that I have worked on is The Event of a Thread, which is now on show at the museum. It brings together 25 international contemporary artists who use textile to create aesthetic and cultural narratives through objects, paintings, installations and video works.

Organized in collaboration with the Institute for Foreign Cultural Relations (ifa, Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen), one of the oldest art institutions in Germany, we worked with curators Susanne Weiss and Inka Gressel. Starting with works by 15 artists in Germany, the exhibition took on a different form with the inclusion of works by 10 artists from Turkey.

The Event of a Thread features a variety of stories ranging from the tradition of quipu used by ancient Andean cultures in South America to the textile techniques from the indigenous people of Wichí in Argentine and from Bedri Rahmi Eyüboğlu’s revival and adoption of the long-forgotten tradition of yazma (originally used for hand-painted kerchief) to Burhan Doğançay’s tapestries created at the Aubusson workshops. The exhibition focuses on the historical, social and cultural meanings of fabrics, investigates the various uses of textile as a tool of expression, and presents different artistic positions that interact with one another within the exhibition space.

Newsweek’s Top 8 Museums to Visit in Tokyo

This article was first published online in Newsweek https://www.newsweek.com/8-best-museums-tokyo-1446272

For those of you attending ICOM Kyoto 2019 in September, you might consider spending time visiting museums across Japan.  This article (from Newsweek) is the first we will be sharing over the coming weeks about recommended museums to visit during your trip to Japan.

Tokyo has incredible, world-class museums.  We hope you will have a chance to visit some of them (with your ICOM card) on your next visit to Japan.

Tokyo National Museum

Opened in 1892, this intriguing museum is one of Japan’s oldest and most lauded. The museum holds thousands or items, artifacts, and artworks from Japan and Asia and it’s especially recommended to spend an afternoon here near the beginning of your trip to get an excellent orientation on the history of Japan.

Edo-Tokyo Museum

Tokyo is a city that has looked to the future so much, it’s sometimes difficult to see its past. You can do just that at this fascinating museum, which takes visitors back to the city formerly known as Edo (until 1869, that is). There are interactive aspects, bringing the visitor back centuries to see what life and culture were like in the city centuries ago. It’s everything you’ve ever wanted to know about Edo/Tokyo’s past but didn’t know how to even ask.

Mori Art Museum

Housed on the 53rd floor of the Rippongi Hills Mori Tower, the Mori exhibits more than just great contemporary art. Also, ascend yourself up here for the insane views. The museum only recently began collecting contemporary art for a permanent collection. Its focus is mostly on Japanese and some Asian artists. It also does moving and temporary exhibits. Everyone from Ai Weiwei to Bill Viola have had shows here.

National Museum of Nature and Science

Hidesaburo Ueno had a very loyal dog named Hachiko. So loyal that the akita would meet Ueno at Shibuya station every evening. But one day in 1925 Ueno didn’t show up. He had died at work. But Hachiko remained. He would return to the platform every evening for the next decade hoping Mr. Ueno would finally arrive. Hachiko eventually went to doggy heaven and captured the love of a nation. Today his taxidermied body can be found in this fascinating museum. Oh yeah, there are also whale and dinosaur skeletons, fossils, and the remains of a giant squid. But don’t forget to stop by and say “konichiwa” to Hachiko.

National Museum of Western Art

The only museum in Tokyo dedicated to the art of the West, NMWA boasts an excellent collection of European and North American art. Everyone from Monet and Van Gogh to Rubens and Brueghel are represented here. The building itself is worthy of a visit, as it was designed by Le Corbusier.

Ghibli Museum

It might help, but you don’t have to be a fan of anime to love the Ghibli Museum. Just a love of being amused and maybe a dash of interest in Japanese pop culture. Showing the work of Studio Ghibli, the museum is a fascinating display of the work that introduced to the world some of the most beloved anime characters – Princess Mononoke and Totoro, etc.

Meguro Parasitological Museum

In the early 1950s, Dr. Satoru Kamegai was met with an abundance of patients suffering from various parasites caused by poor living conditions in post-war Japan. So, as one does, he decided to create a museum around these parasites. Welcome to the Meguro Parasitological Museum, which displays 300 of the 45,000 parasites he encountered. Don’t forget to exit through the gift shop where you can purchase parasite-related paraphernalia. Probably best to hit this museum after lunch.

Yayoi Kusama Museum

Welcome to the bright electric Kool-Aid acid test world of artist Yayoi Kusama. This Shinjuku museum takes you through Kusama’s career, in which she has become one of Japan’s most famous, beloved, and eccentric artists. Her avant-garde and brightly colored works are a wannabe Instagram influencer’s dream. Bring on the self-affirmative “likes”! Reserve a ticket in advance, as only 200 art-loving visitors per day are allowed entry.

Highland Warriors Exhibition in Canada

Meet the Highland soldier, an almost mythical figure with many faces: fierce protector of clans, adventurous soldier of fortune, defiant rebel, national and international hero.

The Ottawa world premiere of Highland Warriors, a major new exhibition at the Canadian War Museum, explores the changing role and reputation of these iconic kilted fighters, from the broadsword-wielding medieval warrior to today’s elite modern soldier.

The exhibition features over 200 artifacts, from Scottish museums’ world-class collections and from the Canadian War Museum, including fearsome double-handed swords, dangerous dirks, lavishly decorated pistols, uniforms, bagpipes, paintings, photographs, and military awards from two World Wars.

The exhibition at the Canadian War Museum runs from 7 June 2019 until 12 January 2020.  Learn more about the exhibition at https://www.warmuseum.ca/highlandwarriors/

An exhibition developed by Nomad Exhibitions in collaboration with the Canadian War Museum and Glasgow Museums.

UK – China Connections Through Culture Grants

Running for nearly a decade, Connections through Culture is a long-term programme to develop exciting cultural collaborations between artists and arts organisations, supporting long-lasting relationships between China and the UK.

The programme offers support, information, advice, networking opportunities and development grants to artists and arts organisations in China and the UK.

China and the UK both have a rich cultural heritage. Artists and arts organisations in both countries can benefit from the inspiration gained from exchanging ideas and sharing their cultural history.

Although the grants are available to all UK artists, Connections through Culture receives additional specific support from the Scottish government for projects with a Scottish connection.

What does Connections through Cultures offer?

Professional Development Grants (£2,500)

A limited number of small grants to enable artists or members of arts organisations to visit their counterparts in China or the UK for up to ten days, to develop projects, exchange skills or see others’ work. Grants are offered four times each year.

Alumni Grants (£2,500)

A limited number of small grants for previous Connections through Culture alumni to access follow-up funding to initial visits – starting in April 2016. These grants are only available to alumni who received initial grants in the last 2 years, and are designed to be strategic grants to further facilitate collaboration and partnerships. Grants are offered four times each year, in line with the Professional Development Grant rounds.

Details of the next rounds:

Round 32 (visits from Oct – Dec 2019)

Application deadline 4 August 2019

Round 33 (visits Jan – Mar 2020)

Applications open 30 September 2019

Application deadline 3 November 2019

Round 34 (visits April – June 2020)

Applications open 30 December 2019

Application deadline 2 February 2020

Read more about the programme and access the application form at https://www.britishcouncil.cn/en/programmes/arts/connections-culture

British Council’s UK in Japan 2019-20 season

The cultural programme aims to build new cultural relationships with Japan. Leading British institutions will present work from the worlds of classical music, theatre, visual arts, and disability arts, continuing a legacy of inclusivity borne out of the 2012 Paralympics in London. Highlights of UK in JAPAN cultural events include:

  • The Burrell Collection touring masterpieces of French painting, alongside supporting works from Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum
  • The Courtauld Gallery staging an exhibition of treasures from its Impressionist and Post-impressionist collection in three museums across Japan
  • A British Council partnership with the London Symphony Orchestra engaging diverse members of the Japanese community in the creation of music, plus their Musical Director, Sir Simon Rattle, returning to Japan for a series of concerts
  • The first ever BBC Proms taking place in Japan in autumn 2019 with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, led by Chief Conductor Thomas Dausgaard
  • Jason Bruges Studio’s large-scale robotic installation, The Constant Gardeners, inspired by Olympic athletes.
  • Drake Music and the City of Kawasaki’s cutting-edge creative tech project, increasing access to music and co-creating new instruments with and for disabled people
  • Graeae Theatre Company’s collaborative production of Shakespeare’s The Tempest with deaf and disabled artists from Japan, the UK and Bangladesh, directed by Jenny Sealey
  • A large-scale solo exhibition showcasing the diverse works of contemporary artist Julian Opie
  • National Dance Company Wales celebrate rugby with a contemporary dance performance
  • An exhibition of around 60 masterpieces from the National Gallery Collection, including Vincent van Gogh’s Sunflowers, which travel to Japan for the first time
  • Philharmonia Orchestra performing concerts with Principal Conductor EsaPekka Salonen
  • Royal Court Theatre’s international playwriting workshops hosted by the New National Theatre Tokyo, led by Royal Court playwrights and members of the theatre’s Artistic Team
  • The Royal Opera returning to Japan with productions of Faust and Otello
  • Scottish Ensemble and composer Anna Meredith transforms Vivaldi’s Four Seasons into an original new piece, Anno
  • Traverse Theatre connecting two Scottish playwrights with residencies in Japan

Matt Burney, Country Director Japan at British Council, comments: “Our cultural relationship provides a very strong foundation from which we can build trust, learn from each other and enable business links to flourish. There is no better time to be celebrating ties with UK in Japan 2019-20. The eyes of the world will be on Japan as we enter a new Japanese era, and with the country hosting the Rugby World Cup and the Olympics and Paralympics. We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to celebrate and develop the deep ties that exist between our countries. The artists chosen to participate in the Ise residency will come to represent the embodiment of the cultural relationship that exists between the UK and Japan.”

Read more about the UK in Japan 2019-20 at https://www.britishcouncil.jp/en/uk-japan-2019-20

Dubai’s museum of the future: a new world icon?

This article was first published in CNN Travel online https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/dubai-museum-of-the-future-intl/index.html

Drivers on Sheikh Zayed Road, the largest highway in Dubai, will have noticed what looks like a giant eye rising alongside the iconic Emirates Towers.  The eye — technically a torus shape — is the latest grand statement of ambition to mark the emirate’s skyline.
The Museum of the Future stands encased in stainless steel adorned with Arabic calligraphy.
The design has already won awards, although the museum does not open until next year.
Plans for the interior are equally ambitious. The museum aims to serve as a base for exploration of the greatest challenges and technologies that will shape the future, from climate change to medical breakthroughs.

Immersive experience

The museum is an initiative of the Dubai Future Foundation, led by Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, which has a mandate to make the city a “hub for innovation and a testbed for emerging technologies.”
The Foundation’s other projects include a global blockchain council, autonomous transport, and a recreation of the Palmyra Arch.  The Museum of the Future was first launched as a series of temporary accelerator programs on the role of technology in fields such as healthcare, climate change, and food security. The permanent institution will cover similar themes in greater depth.
“We’re not focused on flashy, futuristic gadgets,” says executive director Lath Carlson, who previously managed the Living Computers museum in Seattle.
“We want to look at questions like: how might people live in a near-Earth orbit space station? How might we respond to ecosystem collapse? And then to bring it closer to the individual, how might we focus on wellness and emotional health in the future?”
Carlson says he has always resisted the convention of museums keeping exhibits sealed off behind glass. Three of the seven floors of this museum will be given over to immersive experiences that will be “more like theatrical experiences than a typical exhibition,” he says.
Climate change will feature heavily, with displays outlining different scenarios that could play out if emissions are not curbed. Carlson says the treatment will not soft-peddle the severity of the crisis, but will encourage faith in solutions too.
The executive director is keen to emphasize that the museum will set an example on sustainability. The LEED-certified building will draw power from a solar plant, and provide electric car charging facilities. Sustainability considerations will inform the choice of food served in site restaurants.

‘Most ambitious project’

Shaun Killa, head of architecture firm Killa Design, says the technical demands of the museum made this “the most ambitious” project he has worked on.
The firm used sophisticated modeling tools to plan the unique, curved structure, composed of thousands of interlocking steel triangles.
They used computer-controlled machining tools to cut more than 1,000 molds that support the fiberglass and stainless steel system on the facade.
Developing the outer shell to be smooth and seamless, as well as environmentally conscious, tested the architects’ creativity. Killa believes the final product breaks new ground.
“The entire facade system is unitized, which means the structure, the windows, the insulation, and the waterproofing is all one system,” he says. “That has never been done before.”
Killa believes the museum has the potential to “become one of those world icons,” and that the pioneering methods used here could find wider application.
“We are trying to create new techniques and innovations, to push the envelope in terms of sustainability and building technology,” says Killa. “We’re finding new ways to do things that maybe set precedents for projects in future.”

Strategic importance

The museum holds strategic importance for Dubai’s ambitious government.
Development of culture is key to the city’s tourism strategy, aiming to become a “global hub of creative industries…and a capital of cultural tourism.”
“There’s not really a museum culture in Dubai,” says Carlson. “This (project) is partly about building that.”
The government also sees the development of advanced technology as vital to its ambitions and the museum will combine a cultural attraction with a demonstration of technical prowess.
It will be a centerpiece of Dubai’s Expo 2020, and much is expected.

2019-20 ICOM UK – British Council Travel Grant Scheme is open for applications

Applications are now open for the 2019-20 ICOM UK – British Council Travel Grant Scheme.

ICOM UK, with support from the British Council, is pleased to offer travel grants to support UK organisations seeking to build reciprocally beneficial international projects and partnerships.

The 2019-20 ICOM UK – British Council Travel Grant Scheme will enable recipients to undertake an international visit to meet with colleagues and share skills, expertise and experience.  The Travel Grant Scheme supports museums who are starting to develop mutually beneficial international projects and partnerships.

Applications will be considered for grants up to £1,500 per organisation or consortium for visits beyond greater Europe and up to £700 for visits within greater Europe.  The total amount of funding available for 2019-20 is £28,500.

The grant will cover the cost of travel, including international and local transport, visas, accommodation and subsistence.

Case Studies from previous grant recipients can be read on the ICOM UK website http://uk.icom.museum/resources/case-studies/

 

2019 DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS

Deadline for applications: 09:00 Monday 14 October 2019

Successful applicants notified: w/c 28 October 2019

Travel must be completed by: 30 June 2020

 

The eligibility criteria, guidelines and application form are available on the ICOM UK website at http://uk.icom.museum/about-us/bursaries/

NEMO Conference: Museums 2030 – sharing recipes for a better future

Registration for NEMO’s European Museum Conference 2019 has opened.

The conference will focus on the role that museums can play with regard to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s). Our goal is to inspire museums to step it up and dare to take action with regard to the SDG’s, while demonstrating that they can become key players and take on a range of different roles to help to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as well as to contribute to a better and more sustainable future.

Join colleagues 7-10 November 2019 at the Estonian National Museum to get inspired and to connect with museums all over Europe!

Register now at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe7H8EM5aZR8R-rs3XorWYu2lgz1NcjJ61Xe1V50dSFUwUtgQ/viewform

Visit www.europeanmuseumconference.org for more information and the programme

ICOM UK